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Cite My Sources

This guide will help you locate information on citing your sources for research and projects.

Citing Business Documents

Business documents and reports can be trickier to cite than regular books and articles. 

You should always check with your instructor about proper citation styles for your course projects, but the Chicago Manual of Style is commonly used for this field. 

You will need to compile a list of all the sources you use in a bibliography at the end of your research paper. In addition, you will need to cite every piece of information you use from other resources throughout your paper in footnotes/endnotes or in-text citations. Your instructor should let you know their preference. Though bibliography and footnote/endnote citations look similar, they are formatted slightly differently. 

Analyst Reports:

Bibliography
Last Name, First Name. "Title." Publisher, Date. URL (if not from a database), accessed Date.

For example:
Hadad, Jonathan. "Video Game Software Publishing in the US." IBISWorld, July 2018. Accessed August 20, 2018.

Footnote/Endnote
First and Last Name, "Title," Publisher, Date, Page Number (if applicable/available), URL (if not from a database), accessed Date.

For example:
Jonathan Hadad, "Video Game Software Publishing in the U.S.," IBISWorld, July 2018, p. 20, accessed August 20, 2018.

Repeated citations in your footnotes/endnotes can be abbreviated. 

For example:
Hadad, "Video Game Software Publishing in the U.S.," p. 20.

Check out the links below for more helpful resources:

Source Lines

You should also cite any images or data visuals (such as charts and graphs) you used by providing a source line. The source line is typically inserted directly under the image, and should be formatted the same as a footnote. The reader should be able to tell where exactly you got the visual aid. You can add descriptive commentary after the source line, but it shouldn't be necessary if you refer to it in the body of your text.

For example:
Joanthan Hadad, "Video Game Software Publishing in the US," IBISWorld, July 2018, p. 20, accessed August 20, 2018. Graph depicting industry life cycle.